Sunday, June 27, 2010

Walking Izmir

After the taxi delivered us back to the port and said goodbye to our traveling partners, my husband and I were in no hurry to get back to the ship. It was far too early in the day we thought to be cooped up in this floating buffet. And just outside the port was what looked like a bustling seaside town, why not explore as much as time would allow us. Plus husband was in search for a raki to bring home.

So we walked and walked and found a street that was mostly pedestrian and lined with stores and eats. We were not hungry, not at all, but we saw this small cafe - mostly bakery that has a few tables. The people who worked there were so friendly that a cursory peek on our part ended up over 30 minutes of eating and talking.
This is Zelda. She spoke no English. But her warmth and congeniality crossed any language barrier. She managed to get our orders correctly. She inquired where we came from and when we replied SAN FRANCISCO. She gave us a very big smile and said I LIKE, which I took to mean she like to visit SF someday.
I didn't get this guy's name, but he was preparing the pizza. They wanted us to wait for the pizza, but we weren't in the mood for pizza that day. All we wanted to try were Turkish delights, yummies that we couldn't get home. Although on hindsight maybe we should have waited for the pizza. I've never had Turkish pizza before. Anyone had Turkish pizza before?
We ordered two different types of pastries with our Turkish coffee -the best coffee I had so far. When our pastries arrived, there were five pastries on the plate. I told my husband they have made a mistake. We tried to explain to Zelda that we only ordered two kinds. It was not a mistake. They gave us those three other pastries to try for FREE. They wanted us to try what else Turkey has to offer in terms of pastries. Isn't that touching gesture? How very kind to strangers.
They don't look fancy, but they are really good.
The display has a feel of those bakeries back home where as a child I pressed my face on the glass shelves to take a closer look at the bread with unknown fillings.
What a lovely experience for me and my husband. Zelda and every one in the cafe were very friendly. A memorable time.

~ This is a scheduled post. I am currently away. Will visit your blogs when I get back to my regular schedule.~

14 comments:

  1. Those delicacies really look yummy! I was invited to dinner by a Turkish American family at Houston once. I think they served some of these delicacies. They tasted great.

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  2. All these pastries look delicious! It seems that you don't have to be on the "floating buffet" to find good eats to indulge in!

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  3. I love the picture of a smiling Zelda - so sweet a smile it's almost like the pastries she were selling.

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  4. Oh yes. Turkish pizza is something you can get all over Holland because of the huge mid-eastern population here. We love it, Maria. Not at all what you think of, though, when you say pizza. It's rolled up like a burrito. Turkish hospitality. I'm so glad it exists everywhere. The universal language is a smile and can work wonders!

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  5. Mmmmmm... Baklavas! I love these! :-)

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  6. This is Zelda. She spoke no English. But her warmth and congeniality crossed any language barrier. >>> it sounds so much like the vietnamese. their hospitality can be seen beyond the language barrier.

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  7. i haven't tried turkish sweets nor have i tried turkish pizza?! i'll let you know when i have soon! ^0^
    it's nice to know that amidst the barrier, there are still kind and hospitable people left, sadly, in all my trips, i don;t think i've met "them" yet. ^0^
    i wish you a nice and pleasant getaway. stay safe dear! ^-^

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  8. yummy pastries...and Zelda looks lovely.

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  9. hout about baclava? learned about turkish sweets at various weekend markets here :P

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  10. wow ang bait naman nya! so how's pizza? galing! kindness shows kahit diff language kayo no? :)

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  11. Ohhh, Turkish coffee and pastries! I so envy you! They all look so yummy!

    On another trip again? Stay safe and have a wonderful time!

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  12. Your post encourages me to try turkish coffee and pizza. I think these are available in the UAE.

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  13. Delicious pastries indeed!
    Have a beautiful time in your new trip!

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  14. The Greeks and the Turkish are really very friendly people. They're very hospitable, too, just like Filipinos.

    Those sweet things are gorgeous! Send some my way :)

    Thank you for your well wishes on Norwich Daily Photo's 3rd birthday. Here's to another great year of photos.

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